It's a blog of stars and shit innit
scanzen:

The Spectacular Fiery Death of the Albert Einstein Spacecraft
This amazing reentry fireworks was observed from the International Space Station on 2 November at 12:04 GMT. We can see European Space Agency’s fourth Automated Transfer Vehicle, Albert Einstein, disintegrating and burning up in the atmosphere over an uninhabited area of the Pacific Ocean, in the most spectacular way, after it left the International Space Station a week earlier with 1.6 tonnes of waste.
Source of gif: ESA/NASA

scanzen:

The Spectacular Fiery Death of the Albert Einstein Spacecraft

This amazing reentry fireworks was observed from the International Space Station on 2 November at 12:04 GMT. We can see European Space Agency’s fourth Automated Transfer Vehicle, Albert Einstein, disintegrating and burning up in the atmosphere over an uninhabited area of the Pacific Ocean, in the most spectacular way, after it left the International Space Station a week earlier with 1.6 tonnes of waste.

Source of gif: ESA/NASA

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Antarctica from space

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Antarctica from space

sagansense:

Thanks to observations by telescopes such as Hubble, we can estimate that there are over one hundred billion galaxies in our universe – and they’re just the ones we could see. So, by knowing the proportion of the sky that the grain of sand is covering, we can estimate the number of galaxies in that area.
Galaxies are huge swirling masses of stars, dust, and dark matter, and each galaxy can contain anywhere from 10 million stars (for a dwarf galaxy) to a thousand billion stars (for a giant galaxy). So even if your grain of sand was hiding only dwarf galaxies, it would still cover around a hundred billion stars!
Read more on this awe-inspiring fact at Physics.org

sagansense:

Thanks to observations by telescopes such as Hubble, we can estimate that there are over one hundred billion galaxies in our universe – and they’re just the ones we could see. So, by knowing the proportion of the sky that the grain of sand is covering, we can estimate the number of galaxies in that area.

Galaxies are huge swirling masses of stars, dust, and dark matter, and each galaxy can contain anywhere from 10 million stars (for a dwarf galaxy) to a thousand billion stars (for a giant galaxy). So even if your grain of sand was hiding only dwarf galaxies, it would still cover around a hundred billion stars!

Read more on this awe-inspiring fact at Physics.org

gunsandposes:

The Moon on December 7, 1992, in a false-color mosaic built from 53 images taken through spectral filters by Galileo’s imaging system as the space probe flew over the northern lunar regions: “Bright pinkish areas are highlands materials, such as those surrounding the oval lava-filled Crisium impact basin toward the bottom of the picture. Blue to orange shades indicate volcanic lava flows. To the left of Crisium, the dark blue Mare Tranquillitatis is richer in titanium than the green and orange maria above it. Thin mineral-rich soils associated with relatively recent impacts are represented by light blue colors; the youngest craters have prominent blue rays extending from them.” (via)

gunsandposes:

The Moon on December 7, 1992, in a false-color mosaic built from 53 images taken through spectral filters by Galileo’s imaging system as the space probe flew over the northern lunar regions: “Bright pinkish areas are highlands materials, such as those surrounding the oval lava-filled Crisium impact basin toward the bottom of the picture. Blue to orange shades indicate volcanic lava flows. To the left of Crisium, the dark blue Mare Tranquillitatis is richer in titanium than the green and orange maria above it. Thin mineral-rich soils associated with relatively recent impacts are represented by light blue colors; the youngest craters have prominent blue rays extending from them.” (via)

n-a-s-a:


 M2-9: Wings of a Butterfly Nebula   Credit: 
Hubble Legacy Archive,
NASA,
ESA -
 Processing: 
Judy Schmidt

n-a-s-a:

M2-9: Wings of a Butterfly Nebula
Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA - Processing: Judy Schmidt

Dream Souls. Photo By David Hanjani
www.photographyofdavidhanjani.tumblr.com

Dream Souls. Photo By David Hanjani

www.photographyofdavidhanjani.tumblr.com

astrodidact:


http://www.dtu.dk/english/News/Nyhed?id={ABB2F1B4-F5F7-4452-BB39-9818EA7CB8F9}

kiggor:

If other planets were at the same distance as our moon