It's a blog of stars and shit innit
Tonight’s “time traveling” annular solar eclipse hundreds of miles wide and thousands of miles long, will turn the familiar disk of the sun into a ring of fire for sky-watchers in parts of Asia and the U.S. West. An annular eclipse happens when the moon lines up between Earth and the sun. But in this case, the dark moon’s apparent diameter is smaller than the visible disk of the sun, leaving a fieryring—or annulus—of light around the edges. The event is the first of its kind to be visible from the mainland United States since 1994. The region won’t see another such eclipse until 2023. The annular eclipse starts in China at local sunrise on May 21. The path of the moon’s shadow then goes over Japan around 7:35 a.m., local time, and races across the Pacific Ocean. Viewers looking through special solar filters will see a ring of sunlight around the black silhouette of the moon.The eclipse makes landfall in North America in the late afternoon of May 20, starting at the California-Oregon border at 6:26 p.m. PT.The eclipse then crosses southern Nevada, southern Utah, the Grand Canyon in northern Arizona, the lower-left corner of Colorado, and most of New Mexico before ending in the area of Lubbock, Texas, around sunset at 8:36 p.m. CT…

Tonight’s “time traveling” annular solar eclipse hundreds of miles wide and thousands of miles long, will turn the familiar disk of the sun into a ring of fire for sky-watchers in parts of Asia and the U.S. West. An annular eclipse happens when the moon lines up between Earth and the sun. But in this case, the dark moon’s apparent diameter is smaller than the visible disk of the sun, leaving a fieryring—or annulus—of light around the edges. The event is the first of its kind to be visible from the mainland United States since 1994. The region won’t see another such eclipse until 2023. 

The annular eclipse starts in China at local sunrise on May 21. The path of the moon’s shadow then goes over Japan around 7:35 a.m., local time, and races across the Pacific Ocean. Viewers looking through special solar filters will see a ring of sunlight around the black silhouette of the moon.The eclipse makes landfall in North America in the late afternoon of May 20, starting at the California-Oregon border at 6:26 p.m. PT.
The eclipse then crosses southern Nevada, southern Utah, the Grand Canyon in northern Arizona, the lower-left corner of Colorado, and most of New Mexico before ending in the area of Lubbock, Texas, around sunset at 8:36 p.m. CT…

solar eclipse in tokyo taken one hour ago 21/5/2012

solar eclipse in tokyo taken one hour ago 21/5/2012

NASA’s Cassini  spacecraft successfully completed its Oct. 1, 2011 flyby of Saturn’s  moon Enceladus and its jets of water vapor and ice.

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft successfully completed its Oct. 1, 2011 flyby of Saturn’s moon Enceladus and its jets of water vapor and ice.

The moon showing Maria, highlands and craters photographed by Ron Arbour

The moon showing Maria, highlands and craters photographed by Ron Arbour

onebiguniverse:

Space Moon

onebiguniverse:

Space Moon

christinetheastrophysicist:


A quintet of Saturn’s moons come together in the Cassini spacecraft’s field of view for this portrait.Janus (179 kilometers, or 111 miles across) is on the far left. Pandora (81 kilometers, or 50 miles across) orbits between the A ring and the thin F ring near the middle of the image. Brightly reflective Enceladus (504 kilometers, or 313 miles across) appears above the center of the image. Saturn’s second largest moon, Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across), is bisected by the right edge of the image. The smaller moon Mimas (396 kilometers, or 246 miles across) can be seen beyond Rhea also on the right side of the image.This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. Rhea is closest to Cassini here. The rings are beyond Rhea and Mimas. Enceladus is beyond the rings.The image was taken in visible green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 29, 2011. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.1 million kilometers (684,000 miles) from Rhea and 1.8 million kilometers (1.1 million miles) from Enceladus.

christinetheastrophysicist:

A quintet of Saturn’s moons come together in the Cassini spacecraft’s field of view for this portrait.

Janus (179 kilometers, or 111 miles across) is on the far left. Pandora (81 kilometers, or 50 miles across) orbits between the A ring and the thin F ring near the middle of the image. Brightly reflective Enceladus (504 kilometers, or 313 miles across) appears above the center of the image. Saturn’s second largest moon, Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across), is bisected by the right edge of the image. The smaller moon Mimas (396 kilometers, or 246 miles across) can be seen beyond Rhea also on the right side of the image.

This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. Rhea is closest to Cassini here. The rings are beyond Rhea and Mimas. Enceladus is beyond the rings.

The image was taken in visible green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 29, 2011. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.1 million kilometers (684,000 miles) from Rhea and 1.8 million kilometers (1.1 million miles) from Enceladus.